Rooted in Tradition on Very Hallowed Ground
Man and Nature, in Delicate Balance at Arlington Cemetery
 

Excerpts from The Washington Times and The Washington Post
Written By Elizabeth Redden and Erik Dihle
 

A day at Arlington National Cemetery is a production worthy of a big-budget Hollywood picture combined with the precision of
time-honored military code. Every 20-minute graveside service is a feat of scheduling, horticulture, cleaning, heavy machine operating,
measuring and mapping.

There are more than 300,000 people buried at Arlington. Because many family members share a grave site, that means there are
more than 200,000 marble headstones that must be lined up perfectly at all times. On any given morning at sunrise, there is a
maintenance crew at work, seeing where adjustments need to be made using a very old-school method — stringing a red thread through
the section to spot a stone listing by even a half-inch.

Approximately 25 funerals occur each day at Arlington. Some of these are final farewells to older veterans.





Service for Master Sergeant Lawrence T. Faulkner October 2nd 2014

Lawrence Thomas Faulkner, 93, of Simi Valley, passed away on Thursday August 14, 2014 in Thousand Oaks, California. He died
peacefully surrounded by his wife Sue of 56 years, son Lee, daughter Kelly, and son-in-law Tom. Larry
was born in Harlan County, Kentucky on June 9, 1921 to John and Myrtle Faulkner. He served in eight campaigns with the
9th Division, 39th Regiment in World War II and The Korean War receiving two Silver Stars, three Bronze Stars for gallantry in combat,
three Purple Hearts, the Combat Infantry Badge, the Legion of Honour, and the Ambassador of Peace Medal from South Korea.
Larry was buried in grave site 4212, section 64 near the Sept. 11th Memorial.
The section is bordered by a street called Patton Drive.

Photos by Mike Fraticelli

Tribute to Larry Faulkner

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